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Should you be screened for anxiety?

reviewed 10/25/2018

Anxiety

Should you be screened?

Occasional anxiety is a part of life. It’s normal to be concerned about things like work, money or family problems. But sometimes this nervousness and worry can take over your life. If anxiety makes it hard to complete your daily tasks, you may have a more serious issue.

Are you often irritable?

If you answered "yes." Many people who have generalized anxiety disorder feel on edge. These feelings don’t pop up overnight. They develop slowly and often start during the teen years or early adulthood.

If you answered "no." Many—but not all—people who have generalized anxiety disorder feel on edge. These feelings don’t pop up overnight. They develop slowly and often start during the teen years or early adulthood.

Do everyday situations make you feel nervous?

If you answered "yes." Adults with anxiety are often very nervous about everyday circumstances. They can be obsessed with being late or worried about their job security. Other people with anxiety are nervous about their health or completing household chores. These symptoms are often worse during stressful times.

If you answered "no." It’s great that you can take a step back. Adults with anxiety are often nervous about everyday circumstances. They can be obsessed with things like being late or their job security. Symptoms often get worse during stressful times.

Are you plagued by irrational fears that you can’t shake?

If you answered "yes." You’re not crazy. Fear is one of the primary symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety is a group of conditions instead of one single disorder. This means every person is different. The specifics vary, but the tension and worry are similar.

If you answered "no." That’s good. Fear is a primary symptom of anxiety, but not everyone with anxiety is fearful. Since anxiety is a group of conditions instead of one single disorder, every person is different. The specifics vary, but the tension and worry are similar.

Are you tired a lot?

If you answered "yes." Anxiety can mess with your sleep. It can also make you feel tired more easily. People with generalized anxiety disorder may have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep. It’s a vicious cycle—a lack of sleep can make anxious feelings worse.

If you answered "no." Anxiety can mess with sleep and make you feel tired more easily. People with generalized anxiety disorder may have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep. Getting enough sleep can help keep anxiety at bay.

Does worry interfere with work, school or family responsibilities?

If you answered "yes." Anxiety can keep you from doing what you need to do. It can also disrupt social activities. If you’re facing these challenges, you’re in good company. Almost 30 percent of adults have an anxiety disorder at some point in their lives.

If you answered "no." Even if anxiety doesn’t get in the way of doing what you need to do, stress management is a good idea. Evaluate your responsibilities. See if there’s anything you can give up, turn down or delegate. If you start to feel isolated or unsupported, talk to someone you trust.

Do you have moments of sudden, heart-pounding panic?

If you answered "yes." Anxiety attacks can be terrifying and severe. It’s not unusual for people experiencing an attack to feel like they are going to have a heart attack or die. Some attacks have a clear trigger, but others come out of the blue.

If you answered "no." What a relief. Anxiety attacks can be terrifying and severe. It’s not unusual for people experiencing an attack to feel like they are going to have a heart attack or die. Some attacks have a clear trigger, but others come out of the blue.

Do you have trouble concentrating?

If you answered "yes." You’re not alone. Having a hard time focusing is one of the emotional symptoms of anxiety. Other symptoms include feelings of dread, anticipating the worst and feeling like your mind has gone blank.

If you answered "no." Having a hard time focusing is one of the emotional symptoms of anxiety. Other symptoms include feelings of dread, anticipating the worst and feeling like your mind has gone blank.

Results

Talk with your doctor about your results, and be sure to ask any questions that came up in this assessment. Together, you can decide what the right next step is for you.

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